San Francisco Highlights

Golden Gate Park 
Larger than Central Park, the 1,000-acre Golden Gate Park’s treasure trove of attractions includes Stybing Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a biodiversity hub where 6,000 plant species, including a towering display of California redwoods, thrive; the ethereal Japanese Tea Garden; a children’s playground; the Asian Art Museum; MH de Young Memorial Museum; and the California Academy of Sciences, with its aquarium, Morrison Planetarium and Laserium.

Even more, the open tennis courts, horse stables, baseball diamonds, polo grounds, croquet and lawn-bowling greens, an archery field, a golf course, and a fly-fishing pool draw an outdoorsy crowd year-round. For a full experience, follow the green panhandle between Fell and Oak streets straight into the park.

Grace Cathedral 
1100 California St at Taylor, Phone: (415) 749.6300
The gothic landmark of the west coast, the ornate beauty of Grace Cathedral is home to hidden gardens, curling dragon statues, and a redwood pulpit that has seen the likes of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and the Dalai Lama. The Grace hosts glorious concerts year round and its Columbarium is the only sacred landmark in San Francisco where freshly cremated remains may be laid to rest.

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More San Francisco Must-Sees

Castro District 
Castro & Market
Travel to San Francisco ‘s well-known Mecca of all that comes with gay life in the City’s Castro District. The North side of the Market District is the center of a mainly lesbian and gay community, boutiques, excellent bakeries, bars, restaurants, cafes, and of course, numerous gender-bending bars. The renown Castro Theatre, the historically important art deco movie theatre, usually screens a lot of old or independent film productions from all around the globe. On Halloween, San Francisco’s center is the Castro while tens of thousands of enthusiasts celebrate in the streets.

Baker Beach 
Bowley St. and Lincoln Blvd and Presidio, Phone: (415) 331-1540
San Francisco’s most popular and locally beloved nude beach is nestled in the western shadow of the Golden Gate Bridge. Aside from being the birthplace of Burning Man, the great qualities of Baker Beach are its size, close shore breaks, tide pools, steep bluffs, and climbable rocks, and a totally nude north end that rubs friendly elbows with a decidedly family-style south side, complete with barbeque grills and picnic tables. While this stretch of the Pacific makes for rough swimming, it bodes well for panoramic sunbathing and excellent shore fishing.

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What To See in San Francisco

Downtown
San Francisco ‘s densely populated downtown is squeezed into the hilly northeastern corner of the peninsula. The often dramatic cityscape came about because the streets were laid out as if their planners had never so much as glanced at the city’s topography. They simply dropped a grid pattern onto the steeply undulating terrain, and the result is that streets often climb or drop at ridiculously steep gradients. It makes parking hazardous, breeds bicycle messengers of superhuman strength and provides a hairy setting for car chase scenes in movies.

Cable Cars 
949 Presidio Ave, Phone: (415) 923-6162
The Powell-Hyde line begins at Powell and Market streets, terminating at Victorian Park near the Maritime Museum and Aquatic Park; the Powell-Mason line also begins at Powell and Market streets to end at San Francisco’s Victorian Park near the Maritime Museum and Aquatic Park; the Powell-Mason line also begins at Powell and Market, but ends at Bay and Taylor near Fisherman’s Wharf; the California Street line runs from California and Market streets to Van Ness Avenue.

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Golden Gate Bridge History

In 1916, San Francisco City officials asked Engineer Michael M. O’Shaughnessy to see if building a bridge across the Golden Gate Strait was feasible. For decades, there had been a call for a bridge like this by railroad professionals and other entrepreneurs.


So San Francisco City Engineer Michael O’Shaughnessy started to discuss the idea with some engineers across the nation to learn about cost and feasibility of such an endeavor. Most engineers he consulted speculated that a bridge across the Golden Gate Strait would be costing more than $100 million but that construction would not be possible. Joseph Baermann Strauss, though, thought that building such a bridge was possible and that the cost would not exceed $30 million.

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Walk or Bike the Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge name explained

The Golden Gate Bridge is named after the Golden Gate Strait, the entrance from the Pacific Ocean to the San Francisco Bay. The Golden Gate Strait is some three miles long and a mile wide, and the water’s currents usually range from 4.5 to 7.5 knots (around 5 to 9 miles/hr). John C. Fremont (a U.S. Army Engineer) named the strait “Chrysopylae” (Golden Gate) in the mid-1840s as the strait was reminding him of the Istanbul, Turkey, harbor named Chrysoceras (Golden Horn).

The Golden Gate Bridge connects the City of San Francisco to the northern counties of California, including the world-famous wine regions of Sonoma and Napa. The bridge’s towers stand an impressive 746 feet tall and its “International Orange” color, the beautiful Art Deco styling, and the sweeping massive main cables give the bridge it’s magic. The bridge features a fine artistic harmony of light, color, and sound which attract over ten 10 million visitors every year, especially during the summer months, so when you plan a visit to the Golden Gate Bridge, be prepared to encounter large crowds and be also aware of quickly changing weather conditions.

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Berkeley Farmers’ Market and Organic Vegies

Every Saturday, I’m in charge of checking out what food we need to buy. As I check the frig, I make a list of what we can get from the Berkeley Farmers’ Market. I really enjoy going there. We get to see our neighbors, and we know that the food is organic, fresh and local.

We buy organic food because my parents taught us that it’s more nutritious. They also knew that organic farming is really good for the environment, and it’s a great way to support our local farmers.

Organic farmers don’t use any synthetic pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, irritation or biotechnology, so we’re taking in fewer toxins. It wasn’t until the 20th century that synthetic chemicals were introduced into our food. Yeah, it used to be that farming was always organic.

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Revisiting San Francisco

It’s funny how East and West Coast cities seem to change a little differently. John Smyre, a good friend of mine from New York, visited the City recently and I couldn’t meet with him unfortunately because of my work that took me to a London Arts Fair. He noticed some aspects that I wasn’t aware of so as I’m confronted with the San Francisco looks and habits on a daily basis. Here is what he wrote to me.

I was last in San Francisco in August 2004. At that time, as a New Yorker visiting the city by the Bay, I was struck by the inability to drive anywhere without being confronted by billboards trumpeting the virtues of countless dot-coms. No less striking was the start-up fever still gripping the city despite the spring market correction five months earlier. At that time, New York had already started its about-face, turning away from its passionate, albeit temporary, participation in the dot-com party and returning to its more cynical, skeptical roots.

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Silicon Valley and Outsider Art

Silicon Valley recently caught up. The “Drawing the Inner Terrain: Self-Taught Artists” exhibit at the Palo Alto Art Center was dedicated to Derrel DePasse, former president of Blauvelt Group of Palo Alto. She was a self-taught expert in outsider art who died unexpectedly last summer before the publication of her acclaimed new book, Traveling the Rainbow: The Life and Art of Joseph Yoakum (University Press of Mississippi).

Yoakum is known for his wild visionary landscapes. “We all assumed he’d made up these imaginary landscapes,” says John Ollman, a Philadelphia art dealer, “but she followed his roaming and found that he’d actually been to most of the places.

” That a tech executive transformed herself into an outsider art expert doesn’t surprise Signe Mayfield, curator of the Silicon Valley show. Like many, Mayfield sees a link between twin cultural explosions: technology and outsider art. “Art that has the human touch takes on greater significance when we’re so surrounded by sleek modernity and technology,” she says.

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San Francisco Liquidation Auction – A Good Deal?

South Airport Boulevard may not be steeped in the same mythic sense of possibility as Sand Hill Road, but today dreams are being reborn at a liquidation auction at the Ramada Inn of South San Francisco, a purgatory where the spirits of dead dot-coms are relieved of their earthly belongings to better float into the entrepreneurial ionosphere.

Like everyone else here, I have come to bury dubious business models, not to praise them – and more importantly, get some computer equipment cheap.

The nearly 1,000 lots on sale this day are from a collection of failed Internet companies whose identities have already faded into the mists, replaced by the 26-page list of items on sale.

When I arrive at the Terrace Room, the bidding is already underway as the auctioneer warms up the crowd with the first hundred lots, mostly miscellaneous office furnishings, lava lamps, a few monitors and hard drives, and a cheap Stratocaster guitar. A friendly young woman sets me up with an auction guide and a bidding paddle (for a $300 credit card deposit) and I take one of the few empty seats.

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President’s Day 2017 In SF

On this year’s President’s Day, in many cities protests were held against the current U.S. president, Donald Trump. Also in San Francisco, many demonstrators defied the rain and had come to San Francisco’s Federal Building as they wanted to express their total discontent with the presidency of bullying and discriminating Donald Trump.

From his pick for his education secretary to his immigration policies, Donald Trump was and is under fire. This became very clear on the February 20 when many Bay area residents came to be heard in the heart of San Francisco, just like in dozens of American cities.

Many protesters chanted “Fight back, stand up, resist, and make clear that our country belongs to us, not to the president.” In San Francisco, just like and cities all across the country, this sort of protests could be heard just one month after Donald Trump took office in Washington, D.C. Also in San Jose, thousands of demonstrators were gathering on City Hall Plaza to make clear they opposed “Trump’s regressive agenda and policy,” and this extends far beyond just the president’s travel ban.

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